The Girl Who Spun Gold

by Virginia Hamilton, Leo Dillon, and Diane Dillon

When Quashiba’s mother brags to the king that her daughter can spin gold, he... read more

When Quashiba’s mother brags to the king that her daughter can spin gold, he is so impressed that he marries the young woman, and then locks her in a room, demading that she fill it with golden cloth. Quashiba must resort to bargaining with a tiny little man who agrees to do the work if she promises to marry him, unless, of course, she can guess his name. This West Indian variant of the familiar Rumpelstiltskin tale has been eloquently retold with a hint of West Indian dialect. The Dillons’ superb artwork includes gold as the fifth color in four-color illustrations, which highlights both Quashiba’s work and the spirit of Lit’mahn throughout. All in all, an elegant volume that holds plenty of popular appeal for young readers, as well as sophisticated verbal and visual riches for older ones. Honor Book, CCBC Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Discussion (Ages 4-10)

© Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2001

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